ABA Issues New Formal Opinion on Electronic Information Safety

American Bar Association pic

American Bar Association
Image: americanbar.org

Since 2006 Lisa M. Nousek has served as partner at Boies, Schiller & Flexner, LLP, where she litigates state, federal, and appellate cases. An accomplished attorney, she was recognized as Super Lawyer’s Rising Star in the New York Metro area in 2013. Additionally, Lisa M. Nousek is a member of the American Bar Association.

The American Bar Association recently released an official document that further elaborates on best practices regarding client confidentiality when sending and receiving information via electronic avenues. The document, Formal Opinion 477, was developed in light of new advances in information technology and the ways in which information is shared. It is an expansion of Formal Opinion 99-413, released nearly two decades ago.

According to FO 477, every instance of stored client information on a device or online creates an ethical impetus on the attorney to protect the confidentiality of that information. The guidance offers lawyers practical steps to securing this information. Additionally, it recommends informing clients of the risks involved in transmitting information electronically to their attorney.

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The Polo Training Foundation

 

Polo Training Foundation

Polo Training Foundation
Image: polotraining.org

Lisa M. Nousek, a partner at Boies, Schiller & Flexner in Armonk, New York, enjoys the sport of polo and supports young people interested in the game. For this purpose, Lisa M. Nousek gives to the Polo Training Foundation, an organization that supports college-level players through the funding of curricula and the creation of polo competitions.

Formed in 1967, the Polo Training Foundation aims to support the future of polo by funding various collegiate and local programs as well as centers for people interested in learning the game. Located in Tully, New York, the foundation has numerous programs for various age groups, from the 15 and under Junior Polo group to college level. The foundation also offers workshops for polo educators.

The current scholarship program was put into place in 2011. The program provides funding for interested students with financial need at any college with a polo program. Those who donate to the foundation are giving passionate students from around the United States the opportunity to achieve their polo goals.Lisa M. Nousek, a partner at Boies, Schiller & Flexner in Armonk, New York, enjoys the sport of polo and supports young people interested in the game. For this purpose, Lisa M. Nousek gives to the Polo Training Foundation, an organization that supports college-level players through the funding of curricula and the creation of polo competitions.

Formed in 1967, the Polo Training Foundation aims to support the future of polo by funding various collegiate and local programs as well as centers for people interested in learning the game. Located in Tully, New York, the foundation has numerous programs for various age groups, from the 15 and under Junior Polo group to college level. The foundation also offers workshops for polo educators.

The current scholarship program was put into place in 2011. The program provides funding for interested students with financial need at any college with a polo program. Those who donate to the foundation are giving passionate students from around the United States the opportunity to achieve their polo goals.

NYSBA Offers Online Referral Tool

NYSBA pic

NYSBA
Image: NYSBA.org

For more than a decade, Lisa M. Nousek has served as a partner with Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP, based in Armonk, New York. In conjunction with her legal practice, Lisa M. Nousek is an active member of the New York State Bar Association.

New York residents now have a new tool at their disposal when they need to find a nearby lawyer that can help with their specific legal issues. The New York State Bar Association, in a joint effort with Legal.io, has launched a web portal that individuals can use round-the-clock.

The new website, nysbalris.legal.io, offers a simple, confidential process. Clients will need to fill out a brief questionnaire highlighting their specific legal questions, and to provide the area of New York State in which they currently reside. NYSBA staff will review the responses and refer issues to attorneys practicing in close proximity to the customers. The referral service is offered at no cost to users. There is a $35 fee if a client chooses to have a 30-minute consultation with a lawyer referred through the site. There is, however, no obligation to retain that specific lawyer as counsel.

A Brief Introduction to the Sport of Polo

Polo

 

A graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law, Lisa M. Nousek joined Armonk, New York’s Boies Schiller Flexner, LLP, as a civil litigation attorney in 2006. Now a partner at the firm, Lisa M. Nousek spends her time away from work trail riding horses and playing polo.

Polo is one of the world’s oldest and most dynamic sports. The primary objective of a polo match is to score more goals than the opponent over the course of six chukkers, or time periods of 7 minutes each. Chukkers are separated by 3-minute breaks and a 15-minute intermission, for an approximate match length of 90 minutes. Polo teams comprise four riders with positions numbered one through four. Players one and two are more offense oriented, while positions three and four provide defense.

Points are scored by driving the ball through the opponent’s goal. Following scoring, teams switch scoring ends as a means of offsetting any environmental advantages. Each of the eight riders is mounted on a full-size pony foal, measuring up to 1,100 pounds. In addition to the players, two mounted officials follow the game and issue fouls when necessary, most of which are aimed at enforcing safe riding and playing actions.

Maddie’s Fund Offers Executive Leadership Fellowship Program

 

The NYSBA’s 13th Annual International Estate Planning Institute

 

New York State Bar Association pic

New York State Bar Association
Image: step.org

A partner at Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP, Lisa M. Nousek practices complex civil litigation and commercial law. Active in her broader professional community, Lisa M. Nousek maintains membership in the New York State Bar Association, which will hold its 13th Annual International Estate Planning Institute on March 23 and 24, 2017.

The 13th Annual International Estate Planning Institute will take place at the Crowne Plaza Times Square in New York City. The event brings together estate and trust practitioners, investment advisors, tax attorneys, accountants, and bankers from around the globe to listen as the leading thinkers in their fields discuss developments in a number of areas related to estate planning, including cross-border planning. In addition, the event will provide opportunities for attendees to network and ask faculty questions related to estate planning.

The institute offers attendees 13 Minimum Continuing Legal Education credits, 12 in the Professional Practice category and one in the area of Ethics. Further, certified public accountants in New York and New Jersey can earn two Continuing Professional Education credits.

The History of Polo, the World’s Oldest Team Sport

Polo pic

Polo
Image: polomuseum.com

Lisa M. Nousek, partner at the Boies, Schiller & Flexner, LLP firm of Armonk, New York, has quickly established herself as a capable civil litigation attorney, gaining recognition as a top-rated Super Lawyer only eight years after earning her juris doctor. In her spare time, Lisa M. Nousek is fond of caring for and riding horses, and has come to enjoy playing and actively supporting polo, a game with a history longer than any other team sport played today.

Polo originated among the horse-riding nomads of Central Asia, most likely as a form of training and exercise for mounted combat skills. It eventually passed to Persia some time around 600 BC, when the first recorded game was played between Persians and Turkomans (the ancestors of modern Turks). While the current game is limited to three or four players per team, the oldest teams could constitute a small horde of up to 100 players per side. Given the prestige and historically exorbitant expense of raising well-bred horses, polo was long limited to the wealthy and aristocratic classes, lending polo the nickname the sport of kings.

After the Persians established formal rules for polo, the game spread outward throughout Asia, from Constantinople in the far west, to Japan in the far east. However, the Manipur state of Northern India, became the birthplace of the most modern iteration of the sport when British military officers and tea planters observed the game in 1859 and decided to form their own polo club, importing the sport to England. Through British influence, the game spread beyond Asia into every other continent, even returning to its roots as a war game thanks to its adoption and support by the US Army’s West Point academy in 1901.