The Polo Training Foundation

 

Polo Training Foundation

Polo Training Foundation
Image: polotraining.org

Lisa M. Nousek, a partner at Boies, Schiller & Flexner in Armonk, New York, enjoys the sport of polo and supports young people interested in the game. For this purpose, Lisa M. Nousek gives to the Polo Training Foundation, an organization that supports college-level players through the funding of curricula and the creation of polo competitions.

Formed in 1967, the Polo Training Foundation aims to support the future of polo by funding various collegiate and local programs as well as centers for people interested in learning the game. Located in Tully, New York, the foundation has numerous programs for various age groups, from the 15 and under Junior Polo group to college level. The foundation also offers workshops for polo educators.

The current scholarship program was put into place in 2011. The program provides funding for interested students with financial need at any college with a polo program. Those who donate to the foundation are giving passionate students from around the United States the opportunity to achieve their polo goals.Lisa M. Nousek, a partner at Boies, Schiller & Flexner in Armonk, New York, enjoys the sport of polo and supports young people interested in the game. For this purpose, Lisa M. Nousek gives to the Polo Training Foundation, an organization that supports college-level players through the funding of curricula and the creation of polo competitions.

Formed in 1967, the Polo Training Foundation aims to support the future of polo by funding various collegiate and local programs as well as centers for people interested in learning the game. Located in Tully, New York, the foundation has numerous programs for various age groups, from the 15 and under Junior Polo group to college level. The foundation also offers workshops for polo educators.

The current scholarship program was put into place in 2011. The program provides funding for interested students with financial need at any college with a polo program. Those who donate to the foundation are giving passionate students from around the United States the opportunity to achieve their polo goals.

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The History of Polo, the World’s Oldest Team Sport

Polo pic

Polo
Image: polomuseum.com

Lisa M. Nousek, partner at the Boies, Schiller & Flexner, LLP firm of Armonk, New York, has quickly established herself as a capable civil litigation attorney, gaining recognition as a top-rated Super Lawyer only eight years after earning her juris doctor. In her spare time, Lisa M. Nousek is fond of caring for and riding horses, and has come to enjoy playing and actively supporting polo, a game with a history longer than any other team sport played today.

Polo originated among the horse-riding nomads of Central Asia, most likely as a form of training and exercise for mounted combat skills. It eventually passed to Persia some time around 600 BC, when the first recorded game was played between Persians and Turkomans (the ancestors of modern Turks). While the current game is limited to three or four players per team, the oldest teams could constitute a small horde of up to 100 players per side. Given the prestige and historically exorbitant expense of raising well-bred horses, polo was long limited to the wealthy and aristocratic classes, lending polo the nickname the sport of kings.

After the Persians established formal rules for polo, the game spread outward throughout Asia, from Constantinople in the far west, to Japan in the far east. However, the Manipur state of Northern India, became the birthplace of the most modern iteration of the sport when British military officers and tea planters observed the game in 1859 and decided to form their own polo club, importing the sport to England. Through British influence, the game spread beyond Asia into every other continent, even returning to its roots as a war game thanks to its adoption and support by the US Army’s West Point academy in 1901.

Polo Training Foundation Offers Intercollegiate Umpire Training

Polo Training Foundation

Polo Training Foundation
Image: polotraining.org

Lisa M. Nousek represents clients in federal and state trial and appellate courts as a partner of Boies, Schiller & Flexner in Armonk, New York. Outside her legal responsibilities, Lisa M. Nousek also supports the Polo Training Foundation (PTF) and funds initiatives such as its intercollegiate umpire training program.

PTF’s umpire training programs operate in conjunction with United State Polo Association (USPA) clubs and provide sponsorship for pre-approved training clinics hosted at any PTF or USPA-related club. Sponsorships cover a single clinic at each approved club and cover half of the membership cost, up to a $1,000 reimbursement maximum.

In 2002, Cornell University allowed the PTF to begin conducting Intercollegiate-Interscholastic (I-I) umpire training clinics during the William S. Fields Invitational Tournament. Now one of PTF’s most productive training programs, the I-I clinic consists of a series of 14 games held over a five-day period where students referee, umpire, and critique one another throughout the program. The USPA I-I staff undertook organizational procedures for the program in 2012.

To learn more about the program, visit the PTF’s website at polotraining.org/intercollegiate-umpire-training.html.

An Introduction to the Polo Handicap System

Polo Handicap System pic

Polo Handicap System
Image: sportpolo.com

Lisa M. Nousek has practiced complex civil litigation as a partner at Boies, Schiller and Flexner, LLP, in Armonk, New York, since 2006. Away from her professional activities, Lisa M. Nousek enjoys staying active through polo.

The sport of polo makes use of a handicap system similar to the handicap system used in golf. Handicaps in polo are represented by numbers ranging from minus two to 10. Players competing with sub-zero handicaps are regarded as novices, while a 10 goal handicap is also known as a perfect handicap. Only a dozen or so 10 goal players exist around the world. More than 60 percent of polo players in the United States play with a handicap of two goals or less. Any player with a handicap of three or above is generally capable of competing at the professional level.

The handicap for each player is determined by a national competition committee. The system is the same for both men and women. Though handicaps are referred to as a three-goal or six-goal handicap, the number does not represent the total number of goals a player is expected to score in a single match, but rather the overall value a player brings to his or her team.

How Cross-Training Improves Polo Performance

With experience in both plaintiff and defense work, Lisa M. Nousek represents clients in New York through Boies, Schiller & Flexner, LLP, where she is a partner. Away from work, Lisa M. Nousek enjoys riding horses and playing polo.

To build strength and grow in the sport of polo, players should cross-train to enhance athleticism. For stabilization and muscle growth, players can do squats. With the addition of weights, squats strengthen the gluteal muscles as well as hamstrings, quads, and groin. Squats also develop the core, allowing a player to stay balanced while riding and swing more effectively.

Many polo players struggle with breathing and have a tendency to hold their breath while riding. Yoga can alleviate this issue, as it teaches polo players to work on controlled breathing and movements, which are vital in polo. Other benefits of practicing yoga include better balance, range of motion, body strength, and flexibility.

An Introduction to Playing Polo

After earning her juris doctor from the University of Virginia School of Law, Lisa M. Nousek began working as a clerk for Judge Steven Colloton in the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. She is currently a partner in the New York firm of Boies, Schiller & Flexner, LLP. In her leisure time, Lisa M. Nousek enjoys playing polo.

Playing polo requires speed and strength. One of the world’s oldest games, polo involves two teams of four players on horses, each trying to score a goal while preventing the other team from scoring. Once the teams have lined up for a match, the official opens the game by throwing the ball between them.

During a polo match, players either gallop around the field trying to get in line with the ball in order to achieve right of way so they can score, or pass the ball down the field to a teammate. Once a point is scored, the teams switch sides of the field and the game continues.

Although polo requires great skill, polo clubs always seek new members and offer lessons for individuals and groups. Those who cannot ride confidently may wish to seek out a stable for regular riding lessons before attempting to play polo.

A Brief History of Equestrian Polo

A New York lawyer, Lisa M. Nousek has supported the Polo Training Foundation and sponsored the annual Friends of Karen Gardnertown Polo Benefit. Furthermore, Lisa M. Nousek enjoys playing polo.

The equestrian sport of polo has long existed in the region stretching from China to Constantinople. More than 2,000 years ago, polo was already being documented in Japanese, Arabic, Persian, and other languages. Over the centuries, the sport ultimately made its way westwards to England and then to the United States.

The publisher, James Gordon Bennett, introduced the sport to New York City. The first organized polo match was hosted at Dickel’s Riding Academy in 1876. The same year saw the establishment of the Westchester Polo Club, the first formal American club dedicated to the sport. One year later, the Meadowbrook Polo Club was established. The latter club exists to date.

Polo is now a popular sport in the United States, England, and Argentina. Played in over 60 countries, the sport is viewed by over 50 million people annually.